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Moto G Fast review

The primary lens takes the best photos of the rear sensors. The photos show perfect color accuracy and depth of field, though there’s some loss of clarity in the background. Although low-light shots are acceptable, there’s noticeable background blur, lens flare, and noise around the edges images.

Cameras

The Moto G Fast presents to have the similar rear camera stack as the Moto G Power. It offers a 16MP primary sensor with an f/1.7 aperture, 2MP macro lens with an f/2.2 aperture, and an 8MP ultra-wide lens with an f/2.2 aperture. There is a bit difference from the front-facing camera, which comes in at 8MP with an f/2.2 aperture compared with the Moto G Power’s 16MP. The primary lens takes the best photos of the rear sensors. The photos show perfect color accuracy and depth of field, though there’s some loss of clarity in the background. Although low-light shots are acceptable, there’s noticeable background blur, lens flare, and noise around the edges images.

The front-facing 8MP camera does a good job in good light. The shots look crisp, with solid depth of field. On the other hand, low-light shots are bad. The shots are littered with noise, colors look muddy, and there’s unnatural blurring in the foreground.

Because the macro and ultra-wide lenses fail to attract, you’re better off sticking with the primary sensors. And if you’re finding for better camera performance at this price, you’re not going to find it. For the best camera quality on a relatively reasonable phone, you’ll still have to spend a lot more on the $399 Google Pixel 3a.

Specs and Performance

While the Moto G Fast is equipped by the same Qualcomm Snapdragon 665 chipset as its G series siblings, that’s where the hardware same end. Also, storage has also been cut in half, to 32GB, of which nearly 20GB is provided out of the box. One the plus side, you can also add up to an additional 512GB of storage with a microSD card.

Software

The Moto G Fast comes with Android 10 along with Motorola’s new My UX interface. Out of the box, the phone provides a nearly stock Android experience. My UX easily permits you to adjust some settings to combine your style and preferences. For example, with Moto Actions, you can allow gestures to quickly access frequently used function. Plus, Moto Gametime lets you adjust notification and performance settings during gaming. You can even connect it in the middle of a game by swiping in from the left side of the display.

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